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Impact of trail-side interpretive signs on visitor knowledge

Hughes, M. and Morrison-Saunders, A. (2002) Impact of trail-side interpretive signs on visitor knowledge. Journal of Ecotourism, 1 (2-3). pp. 122-132.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14724040208668119
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    Abstract

    Interpretive signs provide an important tool for enhancing visitor knowledge and understanding during a natural area experience. The Tree Top Walk (TTW) site in Western Australia adopted a minimal approach to interpretive signs to reduce distractions and allow the site to speak for itself. A 1999 pilot visitor survey indicated that many visitors were frustrated at this approach and wanted more signs installed along the walk trails despite the presence of information displays around the visitor kiosk. An interpretive sign trial was carried out in 2001 to assess the impact on visitor knowledge of the natural aspects of the site. While the trail-side interpretive signs provided no additional improvement in visitor knowledge, there appeared to be a positive increase in the perception of the site as providing a learning experience. The addition of trail-side interpretive signs also provided a point of interest for repeat visitors already familiar with the unique experience of the Tree Top Walk.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
    Publisher: Multilingual Matters & Channel View Publications
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/1778
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