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Emission reduction theory and results in the development of a suitable small-scale, portable, continuous rice husk carboniser for poor rural regions in transitional economies

Orge, R.F., McHenry, M.P. and de Leon, R.L. (2013) Emission reduction theory and results in the development of a suitable small-scale, portable, continuous rice husk carboniser for poor rural regions in transitional economies. In: Tyrone, E.N., (ed.) Charcoal: Chemical Properties, Production Methods and Applications. Nova Science Publishers, Hauppauge, New York, USA, pp. 33-60.

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Abstract

This chapter describes the process of developing a new rice husk conversion technology suitable to the local requirements of rice farmer in poor rural areas of the Philippines. The small-scale, portable, continuous carboniser was designed to enable heat extraction applications (crop drying, steam generation, etc.), while maintaining conversion effectiveness, with a special focus on the reduction of rural workplace carbon monoxide and smoke emissions. The chapter contains the technology optimisation model methodology which aimed to achieve high operating temperatures for heat extraction, highest fixed carbon content of rice husk biochar, and the lowest emissions of carbon monoxide possible during the carbonisation process. A Response Surface Methodology was used to develop predictive models relating carboniser performance parameters (airflow rate, temperature, biochar quality, carbon monoxide emission data) to the carboniser parameters (chimney diameter and ignition chamber opening). The analysis of variance showed the importance of the chimney diameter relative to the ignition chamber opening in determining overall performance. The highest temperatures, lowest CO emissions, were associated with the highest airflow rates, although proximate analysis of the biochar samples showed there was no influence of the relative sizes of the chimney and ignition chamber on the biochar fixed carbon content. Therefore, the selection of the optimal carboniser chimney and ignition chamber sizes were based solely on temperature and CO emissions.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Publisher: Nova Science Publishers
Copyright: © Nova Science Publishers
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/17449
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