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Salinity response of the seagrass Amphibolis antarctica (Labill.) Sonder et Aschers.: an experimental validation of field results

Walker, D.I. and McComb, A.J. (1990) Salinity response of the seagrass Amphibolis antarctica (Labill.) Sonder et Aschers.: an experimental validation of field results. Aquatic Botany, 36 (4). pp. 359-366.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-3770(90)90052-M
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Abstract

Seedlings of the viviparous seagrass, Amphibolis antarctica (Labill.) Sonder et Aschers., were grown in artificial seawater cultures ranging in salinity from 35 to 65%. These corresponded to the range of naturally occuring salinities in Shark Bay, Western Australia, where A. antarctica is the most abundant seagrass. Seedlings showed marked senescence within five days of being placed in a salinity of 65%. Leaf production rates resembled those of adult plants in situ and, as for field measurements, maximum rates were obtained at ∼ 42%, even in seedlings collected from higher salinities. The results of the experiment are consistent with the suggestion that the decline in seagrass biomass, area covered and productivity with increasing salinity in situ can be attributed to the response to salinity and not to other factors.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 1990 Published by Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/17348
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