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Development of reverse osmosis membranes in desalination: a review

Li, D. and Wang, H. (2010) Development of reverse osmosis membranes in desalination: a review. In: Chemeca 2010: Engineering at the Edge, 26 - 29 September, Adelaide, Australia


Desalination is the process of removing dissolved salts and other minerals from seawater and brackish water (e.g. river water) to obtain water suitable for human and animal consumption, irrigation and other industrial uses. This technology has been regarded as an effective way to alleviate freshwater scarcity and ease water stress, which is currently one of the most pervasive problems afflicting people around the world. To date, over 15000 desalination plants have been installed in the world, around 50% of which are reverse osmosis (RO) desalination plants. The performance and quality of the RO membrane largely affects the energy consumption of RO desalination processes, which have attracted great interest. This paper reviews recent development of RO membranes with improved properties, including flux and salt rejection, chlorine tolerance and fouling resistance.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
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