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An account of the decline of Lake Towerrinning, a wheatbelt wetland

Froend, R. and McComb, A.J. (1991) An account of the decline of Lake Towerrinning, a wheatbelt wetland. Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia, 73 (4). pp. 123-128.

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Abstract

Lake Towerrinning, a wetland in the wheatbelt of Western Australia, is valued for both recreation and conservation. Water quality however has decreased dramatically in recent years, threatening its value for water sports and as a waterbird refuge. A preliminary investigation of water quality and vegetation decline was conducted to determine the sequence of events that led to the current levels of degradation. Turbidity, salinity, and water nutrients were found to be very high. Reduced stabilization of the sediment due to the demise of the fringing rush vegetation, and algal blooms caused by nutrient-rich runoff from agricultural land, were seen to be the major contributors to high turbidity. The decline in the fringing rush (around the lake) and tree vegetation (around lake and within the catchment) due to clearing and increased salinity is thought to be the turning-point in the sequence of events which lead to a reduction in water quality.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
Publisher: Royal Society of Western Australia
Copyright: © Royal Society of Western Australia
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/17139
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