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Using the antisaccade task to investigate the relationship between the development of inhibition and the development of intelligence

Michel, F. and Anderson, M. (2009) Using the antisaccade task to investigate the relationship between the development of inhibition and the development of intelligence. Developmental Science, 12 (2). pp. 272-288.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00759.x
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Abstract

A number of authors have proposed models of cognitive development that explain improvements in intelligence over the course of childhood via changes in the efficiency of inhibitory processes (Anderson, 2001; Bjorklund & Harnishfeger, 1990; Dempster, 1991, 1992; Dempster & Corkill, 1999a; Harnishfeger, 1995; Harnishfeger & Bjorklund, 1993). A review of the literature reveals little empirical support for the thesis. This is largely due to a failure to distinguish between age-related and non-age-related changes in both inhibitory ability and intelligence. Empirical evidence is presented from a developmental study employing the antisaccade task to provide support for the role of inhibitory processes in the development of intelligence. Additionally, a case is made for a functional difference underlying antisaccade errors that are subsequently corrected and those that remain uncorrected.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Copyright: The Authors
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/17088
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