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Neuroscience in Education: The good, the bad, and the ugly

Della Sala, S. and Anderson, M. (eds.) (2012) Neuroscience in Education: The good, the bad, and the ugly. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

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In the past ten years, there has been growing interest in applying our knowledge of the human brain to the field of education, including reading, learning, language, and mathematics. This has resulted in the development of a number of new practices in education, some good, some bad, and some just crazy. Hence we have had theories suggesting that listening to Mozart can boost intelligence, foot massages can help unruly pupils, fish oil can boost brain power, even the idea that breathing through your left nostril can enhance creativity. Sadly, there is a gap between what neuroscientists or cognitive psychologists know about brain/mind functions and the supposedly scientific theory underlying the practices used daily in our schools. So what has caused this whole scale embrace of neuroscience in the classroom — a well-intentioned, but naive misunderstanding of how science works, ideological reasons, or financial incentives? This book brings together leading psychologists, neuroscientists, and geneticists to review critically some of these new developments, examining the science behind these practices, the validity of the theories on which they are based, and whether they work.

Publication Type: Book
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Oxford University Press
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