Catalog Home Page

Towards a phylogenetic framework for the evolution of shakes, rattles, and rolls in Myiarchus tyrant-flycatchers (Aves: Passeriformes: Tyrannidae)

Joseph, L., Wilke, T., Bermingham, E., Alpers, D. and Ricklefs, R. (2004) Towards a phylogenetic framework for the evolution of shakes, rattles, and rolls in Myiarchus tyrant-flycatchers (Aves: Passeriformes: Tyrannidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 31 (1). pp. 139-152.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1055-7903(03)00259-8
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

A phylogeny of 19 of the 22 currently recognized species of Myiarchus tyrant-flycatchers is presented. It is based on 842 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from the ATPase subunit 8 and ATPase subunit 6 genes. Except for the morphologically distinct M. semirufus, mtDNAs of the remaining 18 species fall into either of two clades. One comprises predominantly Caribbean and Central and North American taxa (Clade I), and the other is of predominantly South American taxa (Clade II). The phylogeny is only very broadly concordant with some vocal characters and also with the limited morphological diversity for which the group is well known. Paraphyly in several species (M. swainsoni, M. tuberculifer, M. ferox, M. phaeocephalus, M. sagrae, M. stolidus) suggests that morphological evolution, albeit resulting in limited morphological diversity, has been more rapid than that of mtDNA, or that current taxonomy is faulty, or both. A South American origin for Myiarchus is likely. Dispersal and vicariance both appear to have been involved in generating the present-day distribution of some species. Relatively recent dispersal events out of South America are inferred to have brought species of Clades I and II into broad sympatry. Jamaica has been colonized independently at least twice by members of Clades I and II. The phylogeny brings a historical perspective that in turn suggests that ecological study of closely related species from within each major clade where they are sympatric will be especially rewarding.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Academic Press
Copyright: © 2003 Elsevier Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/16636
Item Control Page Item Control Page