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Sulphadiazine-induced renal stones in a 63-year-old HIV-infected man treated for toxoplasmosis

McGettigan, B.D., Hew, M., Phillips, E. and McLean-Tooke, A. (2012) Sulphadiazine-induced renal stones in a 63-year-old HIV-infected man treated for toxoplasmosis. BMJ: Case Reports, 2012 (21 Sept 2012).

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2012-006638
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Abstract

A 63-year-old man was admitted for investigation of blurred vision and multiple ring-enhancing lesions on cranial MRI. Histopathological examination of tissue obtained at brain biopsy showed multiple Toxoplasma gondii cysts. He was started on a combination of sulphadiazine and pyrimethamine for cerebral toxoplasmosis and was subsequently diagnosed with HIV-1 infection. He then developed acute renal failure and flank pain and was diagnosed with bilateral vesico-uretric calculi requiring bilateral stent insertion. The retrieved renal calculi were negative for the common stones that are routinely tested for in our laboratory and had the macroscopic characteristics of a sulphadiazine stone. His renal failure responded to cessation of the sulphadiazine.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases
Publisher: BMJ Publishing
Copyright: © 2013 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/15981
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