Catalog Home Page

The price of protest: Press and judiciary in 1870

Bolton, G. (1994) The price of protest: Press and judiciary in 1870. Studies in Western Australian History (15).

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (805kB)

Abstract

Henry Vincent was always a hard, irascible man, his temper soured by Peninsular War wounds and years of authority as superintendent of the Rottnest penal settlement, and his anger deepened as virility faded. After turning seventy his behaviour became increasingly trying. His eccentricities included cooking mutton chops in a tea-kettle and trying to make a pudding in a colander. For some days he convinced himself that Queen Victoria was about to visit Fremantle. He roared and ranted; he smashed china and sometimes carried a loaded pistol; he accused his wife and daughters of sexual misconduct with their friends and neighbours. 2 Such a domestic tyrant could not overlook the pleasures of making and remaking his will, and towards the end of 1867 he determined to leave everything to one of his sons, the eldest of six adult children aged between 28 and eighteen. Of the few legally qualified inhabitants of Fremantle at that time he chose Henry Wells Young as his adviser.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: University of Western Australia. Centre for Western Australian History
Publishers Website: http://www.cwah.uwa.edu.au/publications/journal
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/15259
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year