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Effect of plasma transfusion on neutrophil function in healthy and septic foals

McTaggart, C., Penhale, J. and Raidal, S.L. (2005) Effect of plasma transfusion on neutrophil function in healthy and septic foals. Australian Veterinary Journal, 83 (8). pp. 499-505.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.2005.tb13304...
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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effect of plasma transfusion on phagocytosis and oxidative burst activity of peripheral blood neutrophils from healthy and septic equine neonates with suboptimal passive transfer of maternal immunity. Animals: Nine healthy and seven septic foals with suboptimal passive transfer of maternal immunity (serum IgG < 8 g/L) presented to participating veterinary hospitals for plasma transfusion, and seven healthy foals less than 7 days of age and with circulating IgG concentrations ≥ 8 g/L. Procedure: Foals with serum IgG concentrations < 8 g/L were assessed as healthy or septic. Sepsis was recognised by positive bacterial cultures and/or sepsis scores of ≥ 11. All foals received between 1 and 3 L of plasma to boost circulating IgG concentrations to ≥ 8 g/L. Serum IgG concentrations were determined before and following transfusion by glutaraldehyde coagulation test and confirmed by single radial immunodiffusion assays. Neutrophil phagocytosis and oxidative burst activity were determined before plasma transfusion and at 0 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h and 5 d following treatment. Neutrophil function from seven healthy foals less than 7 d of age and with circulating IgG concentrations of ≥ 8 g/L was similarly evaluated on a single occasion. Results: Plasma treatment significantly increased circulating IgG concentrations for healthy and septic foals. Oxidative burst activity of neutrophils from septic foals was significantly increased 5 days following treatment, relative to 0 h post treatment. Other differences were not significant but suggested a transient decrease in phagocytosis by neutrophils from healthy foals and increased phagocytosis by neutrophils from septic foals immediately following transfusion. Oxidative burst activity of neutrophils from septic foals tended to be less than that of healthy foals at all sampling times. Serum IgG concentrations were not correlated with neutrophil phagocytosis, but were correlated with oxidative burst activity. Conclusions: Plasma transfusion did not improve neutrophil function of healthy foals, suggesting that such treatment may be of equivocal benefit for healthy neonates. Conversely, improved neutrophil function was observed following treatment of septic foals, suggesting that plasma transfusion was beneficial for these foals. Oxidative burst activity of neutrophils from septic foals was lower than that of neutrophils from healthy foals and was significantly improved 5 days post treatment, when compared with values obtained immediately following treatment.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/14400
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