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Investigating low voltage ride through capability on wind farm by using static synchronus compensator (STATCOM) application

Forest, Zack (2012) Investigating low voltage ride through capability on wind farm by using static synchronus compensator (STATCOM) application. Other thesis, Murdoch University.

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As an alternative to traditional fossil fuel extracted energy, wind energy has been acknowledged as one of the most important sources of renewable energies in the world. This clean and natural source of energy could be a key to solving the worldwide energy crisis with low environmental impact.

The increased penetration of wind power into the power grids mean the impact of the wind turbines on the grid can no longer be ignored. Grid codes these days include the requirement that the wind turbines have to stay connected when the voltage drops. This is known as the Low Voltage Ride Through (LVRT) requirement. Tripping wind turbines during any fault event can have a major effect on the stability of the power system.

A voltage regulation device is needed for stability improvement and power quality improvement of the overall system. The voltage stability issue can be achieved by using Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) devices with the reactive power compensation required by the power grid. FACTS devices are widely used for enhancing power system performance, reducing overall power losses, increasing grid reliability and voltage stability.

This thesis investigates the use of Static Synchronous Compensator (STATCOM) on wind farms for the purpose of stabilizing the grid voltage after a disturbance. The study focuses on a fundamental grid operation requirement to maintain a voltage at the point of common coupling by regulating the voltage.

The simulations were carried out by using DIgSILENT PowerFactory software and attaching STATCOM model in the wind farm model. The results indicate that the STATCOM can provide an enhanced performance to the power grid. This is mainly achieved by generating or absorbing the reactive power to provide grid stability during the fault period. Result comparison was made with the previous results which were carried out by another student in 2010.

Publication Type: Thesis (Other)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Energy
Supervisor: Crebbin, Gregory
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