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Phytophthora diseases in Western Australia and New South Wales: differences and similarities, and lessons for better management in NSW. A summary of presentations made at a Phytophthora Management Forum held by the Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute, Fairmont Resort, Leura, 20th – 21st of June 2012. In: Phytophthora: understanding & responding to the threat of Phytophthora in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area

Hardy, G., McDougall, K. and Dunne, C. (2012) Phytophthora diseases in Western Australia and New South Wales: differences and similarities, and lessons for better management in NSW. A summary of presentations made at a Phytophthora Management Forum held by the Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute, Fairmont Resort, Leura, 20th – 21st of June 2012. In: Phytophthora: understanding & responding to the threat of Phytophthora in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute, Kensington, Australia, pp 41-49.

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    Abstract

    Diseases caused by Phytophthora species are responsible worldwide for catastrophic losses in commercial crops and irreparable damage to natural vegetation. Historically, one species (P. infestans) even briefly shaped human migration patterns when it caused famine in Ireland. In Australia, Phytophthora species have also affected horticultural food crops and continue to do so. One species, Phytophthora cinnamomi, is also having a profound effect on natural vegetation in southern Australia, and may well permanently alter the structure, composition and function of some communities, whilst pushing individual species to extinction (Cahill et al. 2008). Recent research has shown that other species of Phytophthora are also having an impact in natural vegetation in Australia. One species (P. ramorum), though not yet present, is known to affect many Australian plants; its airborne dispersal will make it much harder to control than existing Phytophthora species.

    The aim of this paper is to present information about Phytophthora species that have or potentially have an impact on natural vegetation in Australia and, using P. cinnamomi as a case study, describe current management approaches in two States: Western Australia, where the adverse impact of the disease has been long acknowledged; New South Wales, where the pathogen was thought until recently to be native. We highlight the importance of learning from experience elsewhere to develop the most cost-effective management responses. This will be vital throughout Australia should P. ramorum be introduced into the country.

    Publication Type: Report
    Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Phytophthora Science and Management
    School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
    Publisher: Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/12187
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