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Detection by PCR and isolation assays of the anaerobic intestinal spirochete Brachyspira aalborgi from the feces of captive nonhuman primates

Munshi, M.A., Taylor, N.M., Mikosza, A.S.J., Spencer, P.B.S. and Hampson, D.J. (2003) Detection by PCR and isolation assays of the anaerobic intestinal spirochete Brachyspira aalborgi from the feces of captive nonhuman primates. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 41 (3). pp. 1187-1191.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.41.3.1187-1191.2003
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    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of the anaerobic intestinal spirochetes Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli in the feces of captive nonhuman primates (n = 35) from 19 species housed at the Zoological Gardens, Perth, Western Australia. Both spirochete species are known to infect human beings. DNA was extracted from freshly collected feces with a commercially available QIAamp DNA stool minikit and subjected to PCR protocols amplifying portions of the 16S rRNA genes of the two spirochete species. The feces were also subjected to selective culture for the spirochetes. Subsequently, feces from 62 other captive animals or birds representing 39 species at the zoo were examined by PCR to determine whether they were reservoirs of infection. Six fecal samples from individuals from four primate species (two vervet monkeys, two Tonkean macaques, one Japanese macaque, and one hamadryas baboon) tested positive in the B. aalborgi PCR. B. aalborgi was not detected by PCR in any of the other animal or bird species tested, and B. pilosicoli was not detected in the primates or any of the other animals or birds. B. aalborgi was isolated from both PCR-positive vervet monkeys. This is the first time that B. aalborgi has been isolated from nonhuman primates and the first time that it has been isolated from the feces of any species.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
    Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
    Copyright: © 2003, American Society for Microbiology
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/11982
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