Catalog Home Page

Long-term mortality risks associated with mild anaemia in older persons: the Busselton Health Study

Chalmers, K.A., Knuiman, M.W., Divitini, M.L., Bruce, D.G., Olynyk, J.K. and Milward, E.A. (2012) Long-term mortality risks associated with mild anaemia in older persons: the Busselton Health Study. Age and Ageing, 41 (6). pp. 759-764.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afs150
*Open access, no subscription required

Abstract

Background: up to 25% of older people in the USA and other Western countries are anaemic by World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. The objective of this study was to examine the long-term relationships of haemoglobin concentration with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a community-based sample of Australian adults surveyed in 1978. Methods: a community survey of 2,194 adults aged 40+ years in Busselton, Western Australia in 1978 with mortality follow-up to 2001. Cox regression models were used to investigate the relationships of haemoglobin as a continuous measure and anaemia by WHO criteria (women <12 g/dl (7.5 mmol/l); men <13 g/dl (8.1 mmol/l)) with all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality. Results: anaemia was predominantly mild (>10 g/dl) and normocytic. There was an increased risk of death from all causes and from cancer for men with low haemoglobin. Cancers were predominantly of the prostate and genito-urinary organs, and to a lesser extent the gastrointestinal tract. There was no increased risk of all cause or cancer death in women. Conclusion: mild, normocytic anaemia is associated with survival reductions in middle-aged and older men, where it often occurs with prostate, gastrointestinal and other cancers, and should be investigated to exclude treatable causes.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Copyright: © The Author 2012.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/11423
Item Control Page