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Equine hydatidosis: A review of the current status in great britain and the results of an epidemiological survey

Thompson, R.C.A. and Smyth, J.D. (1975) Equine hydatidosis: A review of the current status in great britain and the results of an epidemiological survey. Veterinary Parasitology, 1 (2). pp. 107-127.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-4017(75)90014-X
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Abstract

An appraisal of the current status of animal and human hydatidosis in Great Britain is given. Attention is drawn to the fact that, whereas the disease occurs largely in localised districts in domestic food animals, (especially sheep), it is widespread in horses, having reached epidemic proportions within the last decade.

Epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that dogs belonging to hunting packs are the major definitive host. The role of the fox is still uncertain.

A survey of the feeding, housing and general husbandary of hunting dogs has shown that they have access to raw uninspected horse flesh and offal. Following the Second World War, economic pressures and labour shortages have been the main factors behind a change in the dietary practices at hunt kennels leading to an increase in the feeding of raw flesh and offal. The survey revealed that of 21 hunts inspected 11 (52%) harboured infected dogs. Worms recovered from infected dogs were identified as the horse “strain” of Echinococcus granulosus.

The potential public health hazards which could yet arise, as a consequence of the increased prevalence of equine hydatidosis, are discussed.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 1975 Published by Elsevier B.V
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/11040
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