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Overcoming sodium toxicity by utilizing grass leaves as co-substrate during the start-up of batch thermophilic anaerobic digestion

Suwannoppadol, S., Ho, G. and Cord-Ruwisch, R. (2012) Overcoming sodium toxicity by utilizing grass leaves as co-substrate during the start-up of batch thermophilic anaerobic digestion. Bioresource Technology, 125 . pp. 188-192.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.08.091
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    Abstract

    Sodium toxicity is a common problem causing inhibition of anaerobic digestion, and digesters treating highly concentrated wastes, such as food and municipal solid waste, and concentrated animal manure, are likely to suffer from partial or complete inhibition of methane-producing consortia, including methanogens. When grass clippings were added at the onset of anaerobic digestion of acetate containing a sodium concentration of 7.8gNa +/L, a total methane production about 8L/L was obtained, whereas no methane was produced in the absence of grass leaves. In an attempt to narrow down which components of grass leaves caused decrease of sodium toxicity, different hypotheses were tested. Results revealed that betaine could be a significant compound in grass leaves causing reduction to sodium inhibition.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
    School of Environmental Science
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Copyright: © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10906
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