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Response: Social learning of risky behaviour: importance for impact assessments, conservation and management of human-wildlife interactions

Donaldson, R., Finn, H., Bejder, L., Lusseau, D. and Calver, M. (2012) Response: Social learning of risky behaviour: importance for impact assessments, conservation and management of human-wildlife interactions. Animal Conservation, 15 (5). pp. 442-444.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-1795.2012.00601.x
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Abstract

The potential for social learning mechanisms to facilitate the spread of harmful behaviours through wildlife social networks has clear conservation significance, and is important to consider during impact assessments and management of wildlife tourism, food provisioning, human–wildlife conflicts and other human–wildlife interactions. The commentaries by Higham (2012), Krützen (2012) and Wells (2012) in response to Donaldson et al. (2012) identify a range of applications that such findings of social transmission of risky behaviours may have for wildlife conservation. Their comments, alongside other recent reports of social learning of risky behaviours by wildlife during human–wildlife interactions (e.g. Chiyo, Moss & Alberts, 2012), provide strong directions for future research and management.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Fish and Fisheries Research
School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Copyright: © 2012 The Authors
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10757
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