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The reliability of a portable clinical force plate used for the assessment of static postural control: repeated measures reliability study

Golriz, S., Hebert, J.J., Foreman, K.B. and Walker, B.F. (2012) The reliability of a portable clinical force plate used for the assessment of static postural control: repeated measures reliability study. Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, 20 (1). p. 14.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2045-709X-20-14
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    Abstract

    Background
    Force plates are frequently used for postural control assessments but they are expensive and not widely available in most clinical settings. Increasingly, clinicians are using this technology to assess patients, however, the psychometric properties of these less sophisticated force plates is frequently unknown. The purposes of the study were to examine the test-retest reliability of a force plate commonly used by clinicians and to explore the effect of using the mean value from multiple repetitions on reliability.

    Methods
    Thirty healthy volunteer adults were recruited. Postural control measures were obtained using the Midot Posture Scale Analyzer (MPSA). Data were collected in 2 sessions. Five successive repetitions each of 60 seconds duration were obtained from each participant in each session.

    Results
    The reliability coefficients obtained using single measures were low (ICC3,1 = 0.06 to 0.53). The average of two measures allowed for reliable measurements of COP mean velocity and average location of COP. The average of three and five measures was required to obtain acceptable reliability (ICC [greater than or equal to] 0.70) of relative weight bearing on legs and sway area, respectively. Higher measurement precision values were seen by averaging four or five repetitions for all variables.

    Conclusion
    Single measures did not provide reliable estimates of postural sway, and the averaging of multiple repetitions was necessary to achieve acceptable levels of measurement error. The number of repetitions required to achieve reliable data ranged from 2 to 5. Clinicians should be wary of using single measures derived from similar equipment when making decisions about patients.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Chiropractic and Sports Science
    Publisher: BioMed Central
    Copyright: © 2012 Golriz et al.
    Notes: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10754
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