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Does improving the accuracy of soil mapping by increasing sampling intensity assist with the identification of pre-European vegetation communities?

Craig, M.D, Freeman, A. and Seabrook, L.A> (2007) Does improving the accuracy of soil mapping by increasing sampling intensity assist with the identification of pre-European vegetation communities? Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland, 113 (April). pp. 3-8.

Abstract

At a local scale, soil type is often the most important determinant of vegetation type, so a good knowledge of soils is critical for the identification of pre-European vegetation communities. We examined the importance of the sampling intensity of soil surveys to the identification of pre-European vegetation communities along the lower Peterson Creek catchment near Yungaburra, Queensland. We increased sampling intensity and mapped soils at a scale of approximately 1:7000 and compared our maps to those from the Queensland Department of Natural Resources and Mines at a scale of 1:50000. We found that using the smaller scale soil map would have resulted in 38% of our study area being identified as supporting a different classification or soil type from the larger scale map. This, in turn, meant that 9 to 23% of the study area would have been identified as supporting a different pre-European vegetation community. We concluded that this low percentage did not justify the expense of a detailed soil survey in our study area and make recommendations as to where ad hoc soil surveys should be targeted.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Publisher: Royal Society of Queensland
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10705
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