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Glycogen resynthesis in the absence of food ingestion during recovery from moderate or high intensity physical activity: Novel insights from rat and human studies

Fournier, P.A., Bräu, L., Ferreira, L-B, Fairchild, T., Raja, G., James, A. and Palmer, T.N. (2002) Glycogen resynthesis in the absence of food ingestion during recovery from moderate or high intensity physical activity: Novel insights from rat and human studies. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 133 (3). pp. 755-763.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1095-6433(02)00254-4
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Abstract

The finding that during recovery from high intensity exercise, rats have the capacity to replenish their muscle glycogen stores even in the absence of food intake has provided us with an experimental model of choice to explore further this process. Our objective here is to share those questions arising from research carried out by others and ourselves on rats and humans that are likely to be of interest to comparative biochemists/physiologists. On the basis of our findings and those of others, it is proposed that across vertebrate species: (1) the capacity of muscles to replenish their glycogen stores from endogenous carbon sources is dependent on the type of physical activity and animal species; (2) lactate and amino acids are the major endogenous carbon sources mobilized for the resynthesis of muscle glycogen during recovery from exercise, their relative contributions depending on the duration of recovery and type of exercise; (3) the relative contributions of lactate glyconeogenesis and hepatic/renal gluconeogenesis to muscle glycogen synthesis is species- and muscle fiber-dependent; and (4) glycogen synthase and phosphorylase play an important role in the control of the rate of glycogen synthesis post-exercise, with the role of glucose transport being species-dependent.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10601
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