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Globalization and universities

Currie, J. (2003) Globalization and universities. In: Smart, J.C., (ed.) Higher education: Handbook of theory and research XVIII. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, Netherlands, pp. 473-530.

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Abstract

The media and American politicians portrayed the attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon of September 11, 2001 as the act of mindless terrorists and principally masterminded by Osama bin Laden. In the same breath, analysts of the attack suggested that the terrorists involved might be located in 40 to 50 nations and in several US states. This indicates a global network. From the geographically 'remote' country of Afghanistan, the alleged terrorists were able to use sophisticated technology to direct an attack on the most powerful and most technologically advanced nation in the twenty-first century. This global network of terrorists could not have existed fifty years ago. When President George W. Bush declared that this is a 'new war', he identified a phenomenon that is linked with globalization. This is not a war against a nation state. Osama bin Laden does not belong to any particular nation state. His organization is global. The fight against terrorists is going to be a global struggle.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Education
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright: 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10503
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