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Humans, dogs and parasitic zoonoses ? unravelling the relationships in a remote endemic community in northeast India using molecular tools

Traub, R.J., Robertson, I.D., Irwin, P., Mencke, N., Monis, P. and Thompson, R.C.A. (2003) Humans, dogs and parasitic zoonoses ? unravelling the relationships in a remote endemic community in northeast India using molecular tools. Parasitology Research, 90 . S156-S157.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-003-0925-3
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Abstract

Canine parasitic zoonoses pose a continuing public health problem, especially in developing countries and communities that are socio-economically disadvantaged. Our study combined the use of conventional and molecular epidemiological tools to determine the role of dogs in transmission of gastrointestinal (GI) parasites such as hookworms, Giardia and Ascaris in a parasite endemic teagrowing community in northeast India. A highly sensitive and specific molecular tool was developed to detect and differentiate the zoonotic species of canine hookworm eggs directly from faeces. This allowed epidemiological screening of canine hookworm species in this community to be conducted with ease and accuracy. The zoonotic potential of canine Giardia was also investigated by characterising Giardia duodenalis recovered from humans and dogs living in the same locality and households at three different loci. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis provided compelling evidence to support the zoonotic transmission of canine Giardia. Molecular tools were also used to identify the species of Ascaris egg present in over 30% of dog faecal samples. The results demonstrated the role of dogs as a significant disseminator and environmental contaminator of Ascaris lumbricoides in communities where promiscuous defecation practices exist. Our study demonstrated the usefulness of combining conventional and molecular parasitological and epidemiological tools to help solve unresolved relationships with regards to parasitic zoonoses.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Springer Verlag
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10482
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