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Evaluation of four serological techniques to determine the seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and coyotes (Canis latrans) on Prince Edward Island, Canada

Wapenaar, W., Barkema, H.W., Schares, G., Rouvinen-Watt, K., Zeijlemaker, L., Poorter, B., O’Handley, R., Kwok, O.C.H. and Dubey, J.P. (2007) Evaluation of four serological techniques to determine the seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and coyotes (Canis latrans) on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Veterinary Parasitology, 145 (1-2). pp. 51-58.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2006.12.002
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Abstract

The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the performance and agreement of serological assays (ELISA, IFAT, Neospora caninum agglutination test and immunoblot) using reference sera and field sera from foxes and coyotes and (2) to estimate the N. caninum seroprevalence in foxes and coyotes on Prince Edward Island, Canada. With fox and coyote reference sera the test performance of the ELISA, IFAT and IB was excellent (100% sensitivity and specificity). NAT showed a low sensitivity (50%). Serum was collected from 201 coyotes and 271 foxes. The seroprevalence observed in the different assays ranged from 0.5 to 14.0% in coyotes and 1.1 to 34.8% in foxes. The seroprevalence, when taking more than one test positive as cut-off value was 3.3 and 1.1% for coyotes and foxes, respectively. From the N. caninum-positive group, all coyotes were older than 3 years. Agreement among assays (measured as prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa) using the field sera ranged from 0.17 to 0.97. Best agreement was observed between ELISA and IFAT, poor agreement was observed between NAT and the other assays. Positive agreement was moderate to poor among all assays utilized in this study. Although the seroprevalence observed was low, N. caninum antibodies are present in foxes and coyotes on Prince Edward Island (PEI) and their role in the N. caninum epidemiology needs further study.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2007 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10189
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