Catalog Home Page

A Single-Blind Pilot Study to Determine Risk and Association Between Navicular Drop, Calcaneal Eversion, and Low Back Pain

Brantingham, J.W., Adams, K.J., Cooley, J., Globe, D. and Globe, G. (2007) A Single-Blind Pilot Study to Determine Risk and Association Between Navicular Drop, Calcaneal Eversion, and Low Back Pain. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 30 (5). pp. 380-385.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmpt.2007.04.004
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Objective: Syndromes causing mechanical low back pain (MLBP) continue to plague the US health care system. One hypothesis is that flatfeet are a risk factor for MLBP. This pilot study evaluated whether subjects with flatter feet are at greater risk for MLBP than subjects without flatter feet. Methods: Fifty-eight subjects (16-70 years old) were allocated to a group diagnosed with 2 or more episodes of MLBP or with no history of MLBP. A blind assessor measured navicular drop (ND) using navicular height (NH) and calcaneal eversion (CE). Based on a range of reported data, flatfoot was defined as a possible risk factor for MLBP with ND greater than 3, 8, and/or 10 mm, and/or greater than 6° CE. Results: According to χ2 analysis, risk of MLBP appeared similar between groups (P > .05). There was no significant difference (P > .05) between continuous variables (t tests, Pearson r and r2) with one exception, correlation of increasing CE with increasing ND (P = .0001). Power was generally low (<0.80). Likelihood ratios and Fisher exact tests supported the χ2 analysis. Conclusions: In this study, flatfeet did not appear to be a risk factor in subjects with MLBP. However, small sample size, low power, broader age range, low prevalence of flatfeet (>10 mm ND), and lesser back pain severity make these data tentative. Further research is needed.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Chiropractic and Sports Science
Publisher: Mosby Inc.
Copyright: © 2007 National University of Health Sciences.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10138
Item Control Page